Giessener Elektronische Bibliothek

GEB - Giessener Elektronische Bibliothek

Shedding of infectious Borna disease virus-1 in living bicolored white-toothed shrews

Nobach, Daniel ; Bourg, Manon ; Herzog, Sibylle ; Lange-Herbst, Hildburg ; Encarnação, Jorge A. ; Eickmann, Markus ; Herden, Christiane


Originalveröffentlichung: (2015) PLoS ONE 10(8):e0137018 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0137018
Zum Volltext im pdf-Format: Dokument 1.pdf (4.590 KB)


Bitte beziehen Sie sich beim Zitieren dieses Dokumentes immer auf folgende
URN: urn:nbn:de:hebis:26-opus-119045
URL: http://geb.uni-giessen.de/geb/volltexte/2016/11904/

Bookmark bei del.icio.us


Sammlung: Open Access - Publikationsfonds
Universität Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
Institut: Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Fachgebiet: Veterinärmedizin
DDC-Sachgruppe: Landwirtschaft
Dokumentart: Aufsatz
Sprache: Englisch
Erstellungsjahr: 2015
Publikationsdatum: 29.01.2016
Kurzfassung auf Englisch: Background:
Many RNA viruses arise from animal reservoirs, namely bats, rodents and insectivores but mechanisms of virus maintenance and transmission still need to be addressed. The bicolored white-toothed shrew (Crocidura leucodon) has recently been identified as reservoir of the neurotropic Borna disease virus 1 (BoDV-1)
Principal Findings:
Six out of eleven wild living bicoloured white-toothed shrews were trapped and revealed to be naturally infected with BoDV-1. All shrews were monitored in captivity in a long-term study over a time period up to 600 days that differed between the individual shrews. Interestingly, all six animals showed an asymptomatic course of infection despite virus shedding via various routes indicating a highly adapted host-pathogen interaction. Infectious virus and viral RNA were demonstrated in saliva, urine, skin swabs, lacrimal fluid and faeces, both during the first 8 weeks of the investigation period and for long time shedding after more than 250 days in captivity.
Conclusions:
The various ways of shedding ensure successful virus maintenance in the reservoir population but also transmission to accidental hosts such as horses and sheep. Naturally BoDV-1-infected living shrews serve as excellent tool to unravel host and pathogen factors responsible for persistent viral co-existence in reservoir species while maintaining their physiological integrity despite high viral load in many organ systems.
Lizenz: Lizenz-Logo  Creative Commons - Namensnennung